School of Engineering

School of Engineering

School of Engineering. Electric Car Engineering

Administration

Mark Horstemeyer, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Dean, School of Engineering

Carl Pettiford, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Associate Dean, School of Engineering

Program Directors

A listing of program directors can be viewed at https://www.liberty.edu/institutional-effectiveness/academic-program-directors/.

Research Intensive Courses

All research intensive courses are listed online at https://www.liberty.edu/center-for-research-scholarship/qep-overview/.

Purpose

The School of Engineering functions with the purpose of teaching Christ-centered men and women with the values, knowledge, and skills critical for impacting engineering and the associated technologies for tomorrow’s world. Established in the fall of 2007, the school has the long-term vision of creating and maintaining nationally recognized technology-related degrees, centers, institutes, and initiatives in education, research, training, and missions so that our Christ-centered graduates can have the greatest impact on tomorrow’s world.

The school offers degrees that provide students with the skills, knowledge, and understanding of engineering necessary for impacting tomorrow’s socio-technological culture.

Program Accreditation

The Bachelor of Science degree programs in Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Industrial and Systems Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering have received accreditation from the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

ABET is the recognized accrediting agency for college and university programs in applied science, computing, engineering, and engineering technology. ABET accreditation demonstrates a program’s commitment to providing its students with a quality education.

Technical Electives

Certain degrees within the School of Engineering require specific technical electives to be completed as part of the degree. The intent of the technical electives is to enhance (i.e. deepen and/or broaden) the scientific, mathematical, technological, or engineering knowledge or experience of the student in his or her career potential and development.

The following stipulations must be followed when choosing technical electives in any of the four engineering degree programs.

Engineering Technical Electives
AVIA 230Unmanned Aerial Systems 13
or AVIA 405 Advanced Aerodynamics
BIOL 101
BIOL 103
Principles of Biology
and Principles of Biology Laboratory 2
4
BIOL 102
BIOL 104
Principles of Human Biology
and Principles of Human Biology Laboratory 2
4
CSIS 112Advanced Programming3
CSIS 215Algorithms and Data Structures3
CSIS 326Database System Concepts3
CSIS 340Studies in Information Security3
CSIS 342Computer Architecture and Organization3
CSIS 344Information Security Operations3
CSIS 345Introduction to Linux3
CSIS 355Network Architecture and Protocols3
CSIS 434Theory of Programming Languages3
CSIS 443Operating Systems3
CSIS 461Technical Aspects of Computer Security3
MATH 302Introduction to Experimental Design in Statistics3
MATH 307Introductory Number Theory3
MATH 311Probability and Statistics I3
MATH 331Complex Variables3
MATH 332Advanced Calculus3
MATH 350Discrete Mathematics3
MATH 352Numerical Analysis3
Any 200-400-level engineering (ENGC, ENGE, ENGI, ENGM, ENGR) course 3,4
Major Specific Technical Electives
CHEM 121General Chemistry I 1,24
FACS 243Digital Drafting I 33
MATH 221Applied Linear Algebra 4,53
or MATH 321 Linear Algebra
PHYS 320Thermodynamics 23

The student is responsible for satisfying any prerequisites for the technical electives chosen and any requirements specified in the college catalog course description [e.g., courses such as the 497 Topics & 499 Internship courses require the permission of the instructor].  Under certain circumstances and where denoted, the course instructor, in consultation with the student’s engineering advisor, has the option to approve or deny a student’s technical elective choice.

Engineering Program Learning Outcomes

The student will be able to:

  1. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics.
  2. An ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors.
  3. An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences.
  4. An ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts.
  5. An ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives.
  6. An ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions.
  7. An ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies.

Certain degrees within the School of Engineering require specific technical electives be completed as part of the degree. The intent of the technical electives is to enhance (i.e., deepen and/or broaden) the scientific, mathematical, technological, or engineering knowledge or experience of the student in his or her career potential and development.

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